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M. L. . 5TEAUNS 



College IFlewe 



Vol. 9. No. 24 



WELLESLEY, MASS., WEDNESDAY, APRIL 20, 1910 



Price 5 Cents 




STUDENT GOVERNMENT 
ELECTIONS. 



President: Constance Eustis, 1911. 
Vice-president: Isabel Noyes, 1911. 
Secretary: Katharine Bingham, 1912. 
Treasurer: Mildred Keim, 1912. 

Join ; 1 1 m. . L>,_rothj Sun 

1912, Mary Colt. 1913. 

Miss Florence Converse's Reading 
of the "Masque of the Sibyls." 



Admirers of Miss Converse's work, and 
lovers of all good literature, found rare pleas- 
ure in the author's reading of her new play, 
"The Masque of the Sibyls," in College Hall 
Chapel, April nth. 

The persons in the masque are as follows: 
Emmanuela, a young prophetess whom the 

children call Ullina. 
The CuMiEAN Sibyl, whom the children call 

Cranny. 
Apollo, whom the children call the Harper, 
The Greek children: 

Ion, who wants to be a philosopher. 

SPYRIDION, a little athlete, who asks only 
to bear burdens. 

/Esklepios, a lame boy, endowed with gifts 
of healing. 

Aoi.ua, who invents beautiful patterns. 
The Italian children: 

Vittorino, who has a sword, and is there- 
fore a peacemaker. 

Felice, a little merchant who does not 
ask a price. 

GlUSTlNIANO, who goes by the Book. 

Cornelia, who plays house and has three 
dolls. 



Mafalda, who loves "every mi 
flower that blows." 
The Gothic children: 

THEODORIC, a little sea-rover with a mis- 
sionary spirit. 
HeREWARD, who sings songs. 
BRUNHILDA, who makes riddles and asks 
many questions. 
Time: At the edge of eternity, from mid- 
afternoon to sunset of a day in spring. 
Setting: Former site of Cumae. Contains 
of the Sibyl, on heights near the ruins 
of the Acropolis. Columns of rnins of 
temple of Apollo rising on one side. 
In the opening of the masque, the children 
are playing among the ruins of the old temple 
of Apollo, building a symbolic wall, when the 
Cumaean Sibyl enters, tearing up leaves and 
scattering them to the four winds of heaven. 
The children are not in the least in awe of 
her, but speak of her familiarly and affection- 
ately as "Granny." While building the watf 
their youthful minds dwell on the past glories 
of Rome, and there ensues a quaint dis- 
cussion of the doctrine of kings. Granny is 
appealed to, and humanly pleased, begins to 
unfold to the children, who group themselves 
at her feet, the old, old story of the Eternal 
City. In a strange, wild chant, in most ar- 
tistic contrast to the light joyousness of the 
chUdreali 1 .:1k, si. iply and dramatical 
tells her story of the Sibylline prophecies — 
how she wrote them, offering the nine luniks 
for sale; the successive burnings; and the 
final purchase of the remaining three books 
by King Tarquin. Too much cannot be said 
in praise of the author's construction of this 
dialogue and her expressive reading, bringing 
out all the light and shade, with the figure of 
the Sibyl always an impressive one, yet never 
overshadowing the delicate loveliness of her 
portrayal of the children. 

Then Apollo appears, accompanied by the 
fearless and innocent Emmanuela. Ever his 
seductive music pierces the air, luring men's 
souls away- But the children stuff their ears, 
and Emmanuela cannot hear him. 

One by one the children creep away, leav- 
ing Apollo to attempt the wooing of Em- 
manuela. Magnificent in his pride, he 
describes his mastery of the world of music 
and light, and defies a rival. But Emman- 
uela, whose soul is consecrated to her Re- 
deemer, whom she sees as in a vision, is proof 
against his seductions, and Apollo, baffled 
mystified in the truly human masculine fash- 
ion, disappears into the cavernous depths of 
the cave of the Sibyl, taking with him the 
old prophetess, who has died at his feet. 
The last touch in the masque is happily given 
by the children, who close the play with an 
exquisite bit of poetry, rejoicing at the re- 
covery of their playmate and the beneficence 
of their Father, 



The children in the masque are exquisite 

representations of childhood. Thi 
moods and words are reproduced with a 
reality and charm rare indeed to find. The 
figure of tlie ("urn can Sibyl, rich in dark 
symbolism, forms a splendid contrast to thai 
of the children, and Emmanuela, the "fair- 
est, wisest, youngest of the Sibyls," is an 
ting connecting link between them 
both. The character of Apollo is not in- 
tended to be the classic conception, but. 
shows us a luminous figure, the embodiment 
of music- and seduction, full of mysterious 
(lattery and smiles. 

As a bit of character presentation, as a 
work of poetic imagination, and as an ar- 
tistically-constructed drama, the "Masque 
of the Sibyls," read so charmingly by its 
author, is a work of which Wellesley may be 
justly proud. 

uple copy is in the b where 

orders for the volume may be left. 



FRESHMAN COTILLION. 



A novel and extremely successful Barn- 
swallow entertainment was given by the 
Freshman class, Saturday evening, April 16, 
in the Barn, when they entertained the rest 
of the college at a cotillion. We were pre- 
pared £01 i plendid time by the .alluring 
posters thai had decorated the bulletin board 
for a few previous days, but this was cer- 
tainh a casi in which realization exceeded an- 
ticipation in pleasure. We doubt if anyone 
would claim to have had anything but a 
rousing good time from the moment she en- 
tered and was presented with her number 
until the lights went, out and the evening was 
This scheme of giving numbers, by 
the way, showed good management on the 
part of the committee, as it avoided the 
crowding that is an unpleasant part of many 
Barnswallow dances. By this arrangement, 
only those whose numbers were called danced 
that particular figure, thus giving everyone 
a turn, and making that turn more enjoyable 
through a comfortable amount of space. 

Tin- cotillion was led by Mary Colt and 
Beatrice Twiss, and consisted of twelve fig- 
ures. A very pretty effect was that of the 
ribbon figure, and another, that of the figure 
with balls. A novel way of choosing part- 
ners was that afforded by the "Slippers and 
i " figure, in which a sheet concealed all 
of the would-be chosen except their feet, and 
one chose a partner by stepping on her 
slippers. 

The favors, consisting of flags, flowers, 
fans and Japanese favors, were dainty and 
well-chosen, and will doubtless have a place 
of honor on the pages of many a Memory 

Book. 

Refreshments of ices were served. The 
guests will surely declare, one and all, that 
the Freshman cotillion quite compensated 
them for not seeing the Freshman play, and 
thank 1913 and the committee for a delight- 
ful evening. The committee was as follows: 

Carrie Powell, 1913, Chairman; Grace 
Hendrie, 1910, Helen Frazier, 191 1, Dorothy 
Conor, 1912, and Marion Prince, Margaret 
Wilson, Mary Johnston, Elizabeth Jackson, 
of 1913- 



COLLEGE NEWS 



College IRevvs. 

Press of N. A. Linosey & Co., Boston 

Published weekly. Subscription price, $1.00 a 
year to resident and non-resident. 

All business correspondence should lie addressed 
to Elizabeth Nofsinper, Business Manager, College 
News. 

All subscriptions should be sent to Miss Alice 
R. Porter. 

All advertising correspondence should be addressed 
to Miss B. M. Beckford, Wellesley. 



Editor-in-Chief, Imogene Kelley, 1911 

Associate Editor. Muriel Bacheler, 1912 

Literary Editors, 

Mary Guernsey, 1912 Carol Williams, 1912 

Reporters, 

Mildred Washburn, 1912 Mary Burd, 1912 

Aldmn* Editor, Elisabeth W. Manwaring, 1902 

Business Manager, Elizabeth Nofsinger, 1910 

Subscription Editor, Alice R. Porter, 1910 

Assistants, 

Ridie Guion, 1911 Frances Gray. 1912 



"Entered as second class matter, November 12, 
1903, at the Post Office at Wellesley, Mass., under 
the Act of Congress, March 3, 1879." 



EDITORIAL. 



H is strange, at class meetings and at the 
meetings <>\ other large organizations, to ob- 
serve how little part a large number of girls 
take in the general running of college affairs. 
Time after time, when matters are up for dis- 
cussion, the same few girls rise to give their 
opinions, and after a long silence make a mo- 
tion which passes unanimously. The vast 
majority sits back in its seat, and, at the 
proper moment, gives vent to a relieved 
"Ave," as though glad to have that over. 
And of course, if a measure works out badly, 
the blame lies always with the vigorous few — 
the indifferent ones, having thought nothing 
on the subject, virtuously feed that the fault 
is not theirs. 

This same spirit — if anything so passive 
can be termed a spirit— evinces itself contin- 
ually at elections. You ask some one of these 
victims of mob consciousness for whom she in- 
tends to vole, and the probable answer is the 
question, "Who's up?" Apparently this 
type of person has no ideas of her own what- 
ever, and is very willing to adopt the first and 
simplest ones thrust upon her. Anything 
rather than thinking a thing out for herself. 

In classes, too, this attitude is manifest. 
Unless the instructor calls upon students sys- 
tematically through the alphabet, the same 
few girls recite and volunteer daily, while tin- 
remainder of the class looks blank, and oc- 
casionally takes some notes. These latter are 
the girls who, when a paper is assigned, never 
dream of thinking out the subject in hand for 
themselves, but hastily scan their notes or 
seek the volumes in the library in search of 
thoughts pleasing to the instructor. They 
seem to lack completely a confidence in them- 
selves and their ability; their mind 
steeped in a kind of apathy resembling so 
much putty, which any passer-by may take 
up, mould, and leave to the next wayfarer. 



Alice Freeman Palmer 
Memorial Photographs 

can be ordered at the 

ABELL STUDIO AND GIFT SHOP 

Print showing bust, Black $ .35 Sepia $ .50 
" group only " .50 " .75 

G. L. ABELL, 
Wellesley, = - - iYlass. 



TiUoman's flDcMcal College 

of Pennsylvania 

Sixtieth Annual Session. Thorough Course. 
Four years. Exceptional Facilities for Laboratory 
and Bedside Instruction. Post-Graduate Courses in 
Operative Gynaecology ; in Obstetrics, the Eye, Ear, 
Nose and Thfoat. A new hospital building in course 
of erection. Full particulars in catalogue. 
CLARA MARSHALL, M.D., Dean 

Box 900. 21st St. and North College Ave., Philadelphia, Pa. 



P. E. SALIPANTE 

Headquarters for 

New Figs, Dates, Nuts and 
Malaga Grapes. 

We make a specialty on Jar Figs 

Tel. 29-1 1 Grove Street 

Orders Delivered Promptly 



DR. L. D. H. FULLER 
DENTIST 

Next to Wellesley Inn Tel. 145-2 

Hours: 8.30 — 5.30 Daily, Tuesdays excepted 



DR. CHAS. E. TAYLOR 

Bentisit 

Taylor Block, - Wellesley, Mass. 

Office Hours, 9-5 Telephone Connection 



Such opinions as they possess are either those 
instilled since childhood or those forced upon 
them by outsiders. For the rest, they pos- 
sess numerous scattered ideas on numerous 
unconnected subjects. Their mental life 
entails no more vitality than is expressed by 
an impartial and much abridged encyclope- 
dia. 

Probably these people an' fairly happy — 
they are so ready to agree with everyone, so 
acquiescent, so .adaptable to every shift in 
the breeze of public opinion, so ready to let 
things go, so long as they are not bothered or 
rendered Uncomfortable. But they seldom 
count for anything - their places in life might 
easily be filled by others of their kind without 
any difference to the world about them, which 
is seldom the better and often much the 
worse — such a clog in the wheels are the in- 
different — for their being in it. 

It has been said that ours is an age of social 
service, and doubtless, as you hav 
heard, from those obtaining the best ad- 
vantages of the age, the most will In- expected. 
Unless you lock yourself in, or retire into the 
depths of Africa, you with the pleasant 
smile and non-committal ways, will be made 
very uncomfortable. You may ignore your 
responsibility or evade it, but you will find, 
in the long run, that, with half (lie amount of 
energy spent in dodging an issue, you might 
have advanced and settled it summarily. 
And not only do you help yourself in so do- 
ing, but you materially aid the few to whose 
efforts you have been as the old man of the 
sea. 

Try to get into the habit of forming judg- 
ments for yourself, and not only of forming 
them, but of expressing them clearly and 
forcibly. Don't drift aimlessly about wait- 
ing for something or someone to solve all the 
problems of existence for you; use your own 



BOATS FOR SALE 

Three Canvas Boats For Sale 
$40 Each 

APPLY TO 

EMERSON O. PERKINS 



fthe Jtttubp blouse 

with the guaranteed navy blue flannel 
collar, also with the linen collars in 
two shades of blue and pink, are for 
sale at C. W. DAVIS' Dry Goods 
Store in Wellesley Square. 

We are agents for Dry Cleaning, 
Glove Cleaning and the Iris Rubber 
Slicker. 

We have had a new lot of Water- 
proof School Bags. 

New line of Neckwear every few days. 



head and your own thoughts and make a per- 
sonality for yourself. Recall to your mind 
i thai man is defined as a. reasoning 
being, and consider well your claim to that 
title. 

And just incidentally, the next time your 
instructor calls for your opinion in class, 
don't try hurriedly to remember what the 
authority in the library said on the subject, 
in a state of mind similar to that of the man 
who enjoyed his book, but hesitated 1 
mend it, as he hadn't read any criticisms. 
Again, when there is an election, don't wait 
for the second ballot to discover the popular 
candidates and vote accordingly — or per- 
haps, as many do, not voteat all; and when 
a question like the Tree Day pageant is dis- 
cussed, take the trouble to know what you 
want beforehand and don't reserve for others 
tlic blame for uncomfortable results. 



NOTICE. 
There are a few suggestions for Freshman 
competitors posted on the door of the News 

( M'liec. 



IE ANY DEALER 

II OFFERS YOU 
A SUBSTITUTE 
WHEN YOU 
ASK FOR 



THE 




Sample Pair, 
Mercerized 26c. 
Silk Mh: 
Mailed on 
Receipt of 
Price. 



HOSE 
SUPPORTER 

INSIST ON HAVING THE GENUINE 

OVER TWO HUNDRED STYLES 
WORN ALL OVER THE WORLD 

FOR THE NAME AND THE 
MOULDED RUBBER BUTTON 

OtORiiS Frost Co., makers, boston, mass, us 



LOOK 




COLLEGE NEWS 



MEXICAN INDIAN BLANKETS. 

THE NEWEST THING for \our College Room, Den, Library or 
Music Room; for Canoes, Rugs, Couch Covers, Portieres and 
Wall Decorations. GORGEOUS COLOR EFFECTS. BEAUTI- 
FUL DESIGNS. Select your Favorite background Color: Crim- 
son, Blue, Red, Green, White, Black. 

7ft. 8in. x 3ft. lOin. $5.00. 6ft. 8in. x 3ft. 4in. $3.50. 5ft. 4in. 
x 2ft. 8in. $2.50. The set of three (one of each size) $10.00 

SILK SCARFS. 

The Most Beautiful Mexican Hand-drawn Head Scarf. Made 
of finest pure silks. Colors: White, Blue, Cream, Red, Black or 
any special color desired. The Only Proper Thing for Theater, 
Opera, Dance or any Evening Wear. Price $10.00. 

SENT ANYWHERE, CARRIAGE PREPAID, ON RECEIPT OF PRICE. 
ORDER TO-DAY. MONEY BACK IF YOU WANT IT. 

MEXICAN BLANKET CO., Aguascalientes, Mexico. 




COLLEGE CALENDAR. 



Sunday, April 24, a1 11.00 A.M., service in Houghton Memorial 
Chapel. Sermon by Dr. Edward C. Moore, of Harvard Univer- 
sity. 

At 7.00 P.M., in Houghton Memorial Chapel, vesper service 
with special music. 

Monday, April 25, at 7.45 P.M., in The Shakespeare House, 
Deutscher Verein play. 

Tuesday, April 2(\ at 4.20 P.M., in Billings Hall, a recital of Scan. 
dinavian composition- by Miss Alice C. Brown, pianist, and 
Mr. Albert T. Foster, violinist. 
At 7.30 P.M., meeting of tin Social Study (dub. 

Thursday, April 29, Frau Amalievon Ende (author of an interesting 
hook on New York, published by Marquardl in Berlin), a mem- 
ber of the literary stall of the New York Evening Post, the 
Nation, the German Literarisches Echo, and also a regular con- 
tributor to "The Theater," and the "International Encyclo- 
pedia Year Book," will lecture to the German Department in 
College Hall Chapel. The subjects of her lectures will be: 
"Zeitgenoessischc deutsche Dichtung," and " Der ncuc Frauen- 
typus Europas." The Department cordially invites all who 
care to do so to attend these lectures, which promise to be of 
distinctive and general interest. 

Saturday, May 1, at 3.20 P.M., in College Hall Chapel, Miss Laura 
I). Gill will speak in regard to employments lor women other 
than teaching. 

COLLEGE NOTES. 



The Christian Association meeting, Thursday evening, was led 
by Marion Knowles. The subject was "Our Ideals, how to raise 
and guard them." This subject Dr. Clifford treated last week and 
Mr. Mott's sermon last Sunday bore on the same theme. 

In the village the subject of the Christian Association meeting, 
led by Katharine Duffield, was taken from Acts 1 : <S: "Ye shall be 
my witnesses." 

On Thursday, April 14, a few members of Course 10 of the 
Economies Department, went to Boston to watch the inspection 
ot the immigrants who came in on a steamer from Liverpool. 

Mis>, Grace B. Bicknell of the Teachers' Exchange of Boston, 
rred on Thursday afternoon in the Browning room with stu- 
dents who are thinking of joining a teachers' agency. 

The Rowing Club had a party at Agora on April 12. 

Dorothy Mills has been elected captain of the 191 1 running 
team. 

The Walking Club made a trip to Echo Bridge in Newton, 
Monday morning. 

Miss Homans announces the following additional appointments 
of members of the Class of 1910 of the Department of Hygiene and 
Physical Education: Margaret Andrews — Y. W. C. A. of Brooklyn; 
Susanne Rogers — The Baldwin School, Bryn Mawr, Pennsylvania. 

On April 16, Prof. Ralph B. Perry of Harvard lectured before 
the classes in Philosophy 4 on "Consciousness under the New Real 
ism." 

Miss Fisher led an expedition of members of Geology 3 to 
Xewtonville on Wednesday, April 13. 




"BURT" 

KNICKERBOCKER 

Dainty Shoes 
For Dress . . 

Made in Our Factory 

Sold in Our Own Store 

Call and See Us 

E. W. Burt & Co. 

40 West St., Boston 



The officers of the Women's Municipal League of Boston 
spoke to the Economics 6 class on Thursday, April 14. 

Professor Whiting lectured to the Woman's Union of the 
Congregational Church and their friends on the afternoi >n 1 >f April 12, 
on "Comets, especially Halley's Comet." A large audience was 
present in the Art Lecture Room, where the talk was given. Main- 
lantern slides were shown in illustration. 

At tlie recent trials to fill the vacancies in the choir, the following 
were accepted, out of thirty-five candidates: Gladys White, 191 1; 
Lucile Rhodes, 191 1; Ethel Trowbridge, 1912: Ruth Rodman, 
1912; Evelyn Wells, 1913; Rachel Burbank, 1913. 

On Friday evening, April 15, the cast of the Sophomore play 
had a dinner at Tau Zcta Epsilon House. 

On Monday, April IS, Pedagogy I had a trip to the Brookline 
High School. 

ALLIANCE FRANCHISE. 



On Monday, April 11, the Alliance Franchise gave a program 
consisting of five charades which were very well worked out, despite 
some impromptu costumes and unforeseen contingencies. The 
Alliance was honored by a visit from Chantccler himself, who ap- 
peared in gorgeous attire and crowed in a happy style. 

On departing each guest was presented with a small imported 
French flag, a suitable memoir of the occasion. 

The Alliance wishes to thank Miss Dalzell and Miss Andem 
for the evening's entertainment, and also Mademoiselle Cheron, 
who helped greatly with her advice. 



PROFESSOR MACDOUGALL'S LECTURE. 



On Wednesday evening, April 13, Professor MacDougall ad- 
dressed the Freshman class on the subject of "Personality in 
Music." Personality he defined as individuality, originality, or 

soul. Because music has no unequivocal meaning, is "spineless," 
in other words, it must have something to give it shape and lasting 
power. This is found in the variety of forms and network of laws 
which enmesh the composer. The three laws, in particular, under 
which he may find himself are those imposed by higher powers, 
by the limitations of the man himself, and by the immutable laws of 
nature. Great geniuses are men who have overthrown the first two, 
while acting in harmony with the third. As a revelation of different 
personalities, Professor MacDougall played selections from Bach, 
Handel, Beethoven and Schumann. In conclusion, he said that 
personality is a most precious thing, that one should respect his own 
individuality, work to free himself from mechanism, and feel in 
honor bound to give to the world that spark of himself which we 
call personality. 



DAILY VACATION BIBLE SCHOOLS. 



The application list for teachers in the Daily Vacation Bible 
Schools is still open, and Miss Button will be glad to give informa- 
tion to any who arc interested. The work has increased so rapidly 
since its beginning three years ago that these schools will be carried 
on in fifteen cities this summer. Both paid and volunteer workers 
are needed, and there is an especially urgent call for help in the 
Pittsburg schools. 

SUNDAY=SCHOOL TEACHERS NEEDED. 



The Christian Association has received an urgent request for 
two Sunday-school teachers needed to carry on the work of a small 
nearby Sunday-school for the remaining weeks of the term. Anyone 
wishing to undertake this service is asked to leave her name at the 
Association Office this week. 



COLLEGE NEWS 




xfe^ 



Ladies' Cuitom Department 

A sk special attention to their 

Lingerie and Linen Dresses 

Tailor-made and Lingerie Waists 

Tailor-made Suits 

NEW EXCLUSIVE MODELS 

•Ty" ^o Washington and 

7>!/^X/^A Summer Streets. 

-V . — ' Bostoo. U.S.A. 



FREE PRESS. 
I. 

The glories of spring are a never-ceasing inspiration to all 
amateur poets and it is not thi this Free Presser to exalt 

them further. It does seem to me. however, that as day by day 
we become more and more enshrouded in the buoyancy of the 
q, we might cast off from us some of our deep-rooted, often 
fruitless responsibility which has always grown to such an undue 
height by the end of the college year. We realize now the inconsis- 
tency of our care-wornness with the blithesome irresponsibility of 
spring. The decision of all the important questions of the universe, 
the complete analysis of human nature and the perfecting of the 
faults of humanity are not left entirely to us. We have not the 
burden of Atlas. Why can we not cease probing into the depths of 
reality ant 1 , soar for a while with the ir imagination? 

II. 

Not long ago, I was talking with a student, a Junior, who was 
utterly discouraged over college conditions for scholarly work. She 
was enthusiastic and eager over her subjects. She desired to get the 
best possible from them, and she felt that she was constantly falling 
below her mark, and imk rming superficial habits of work, 

not because of extra-academic activities n prevent their 

encroachments), but on account of arrangements for which neither 
she nor ot re in any way responsible — arrangements 

especially of the college curriculum, the cut-up schedule, and the 
number of subjects taken at any one time. 

It will be remembered that the magazine rs ago were 

full of articles deprecating the lack of scholarly concentration among 
college students. It would be interesting to know how far there is a 
sense of discontent among students themselves in regard to the re- 
sults of their college course, and how far any inadequate result is 
regarded as the fault of the conditions of schedule and curriculum. 

It would be especially interesting to have some expression of 
opinion from Sen 

A. V. V. Brown. 

III. 

Torn between her appreciation of the boundless enthusiasm ex- 
hibited in cheering for Student Government's successful candidates, 
and the hard, relent" hat a little over five hundred voted 

on the first ballot for President, and a few more than four hundred 
on that for Vice-president, the Wellesley idealist pauses. Stu- 
dent Government, of all student activities, seems to embody the 



f %ei$^ 



Ladies' Hatter 

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160 Tremont Street, Boston 




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We GUARANTEE the Blue Flannel Collar on Our SI. 25 
Blouie to be ABSOLUTELY FAST COLOR 



Our Blouses Are Not For Sale in Wellesley Stores 
MAIL ORDERS FILLED PROMPTLY 

Henry S. Lombard 

22 to 26 Merchants Row, - BOSTON, MASS. 



mMleslei? Inn 



The Club House for 

Wellesley Students 



best of Wellesley traditions and the finest ideals for American young 
womanhood. Ignorance of the elections is obviously not at the root 
of this startling negligence of our tiny civic duties here — and the 
registration slips surely show no such appalling absences. 

At this rate will the present members of this college be soon 
worthy of the ballot? 

IV. 

Though a member of 1913, the youngest of the noble band of 
Free Pressers, I should like to protest about the whispering that goes 
on during Hygiene hour. This, of course, applies to you, my class- 
mates. Maybe you have a Hough and Sedgwick at home, and are 
not at all interested in the wigglings of the skeleton dangling from 
the College Hall chandelier, but there are others who would like to 
listen, if only through courtesy to the instructor. 



PARLIAMENT OF FOOLS. 



On the shores of Fair Lake Waban 
By the shining-big-sea-watcr, 
Is a point called Tupelo, 
Where the pine trees whisper low, 
Where the oaks nod to and fro. 
Where the beeches swinging slew 
List to maid, and man below. 
This happy couple, chatting swiftly, 
Ever murmuring, laughing softly, 
Neath the arched branches lofty, 
Oft forget in their absorption 
Deep in their own sweet oblivion, — 

That other couples come and go 

For at the bench they have no show! 



THE WAIL OF A FRESHMAN. 

It's no joke to be a Freshman in these torrid, springy days. 

Trotting briskly up that hot brick walk, with all its winding ways, 

Dashing madly up to college in the early morning wet, 

Another dash at twelve for lunch in dear old Noanett. 

A sprint for a one-thirty, neath a hot and boiling sun, 

You feel worse than a dishrag when that frightful race is run. 

Then down again at three o'clock to dress yourself for crew, 

Then up again, to be on time you run your hardest, too. 

Down once again to supper, in a moist and sloppy state, 

And up to hear a lecture decreed to you by fate. 

Then back to vill. and lumpy couch and its uncertain ways. 

It's no joke to be a Freshman in these torrid, springy days. 

THE CONSIGNORS' UNION, Inc. 

FOOD SHOP 48 Winter Street, Boston LUNCH ROOM 

LUNCHEON U to 3 

AFTERNOON TEA 3 to 5 

Cake, Pastry, Bread, Etc., on Sale 



COLLEGE NEWS 




The Sample Shoe \ 
and Hosiery Shop 

Have only TWO Shops 
in BOSTON 

496 Washington Street, Cor. 

Bedford Street, and 

74 Boylston Street, Cor. 

Tremont Street. 

(Both Stores up one Flight.) 

Our Prices, $2.00 and $2.50 a pair 

$4.00 and $5.00 grades. 




$3.50, 



INDOOR MEET. 



The enthusiastic audience which crowded the balcony and 
stage of Mary Hemenway Hall, at the Indoor Meet, Monday morn- 
ing, April 1 1, will testify to its success. Perhaps the fact that tickets 
were at a premium gave the comparatively few privileged spectators 
added enjoyment and appreciation; certainly it was a keenly-in- 
terested crowd that beguiled all the waits and filled in all the pauses 
with songs and cheers (musical, you understand!). 

The meet was won by 191 1 with 231 points, 1910 gaining sec- 
ond place with 228 points, 191 2 third place with 205 points, and 
19 1 3 fourth place with 203 points. 

The teams were as follows: 



1910. 



Adair, Helen, 
Bulkley. Helen, 
Dey, Dorothy, 
Elliott, Ruth. 
Hoyt, Margery, 



Baxter, Sarah (capt.), 
Eustis, Constance, 
Fitzgerald. Marguerite, 
Foster, Alice, 
Guion, Ridie, 



Bowden, Dorothy. 
Brown, Lydia. 
Caution-Davis, Ethel, 
Gorham, May. 
Griswold, Lura, 



Park, Esther, 
Randall. Esther, 
Rhodes. Hazel, 
Wilde, Edith. 
Wiss, Florence (eapt.) 



1911. 



Hewett, Mary. 
Lorenz, Marguerite, 
Peltz. Alberta, 
Savage. Miriam, 
Schedlcr. Bertha. 



191: 



Hollingsworth, Cecelia 
Jones, Ethelwynne, 
Keim, Mildred (capt.) 
Lamprey. Helen. 
McKillop, Margery. 



I9I3- 



Rider, Marian, 
Ridgway, Dorothy, 
Shoemaker, Marian, 
South. Helen. 
Stratton. Edith. 



Balderson, Esther, 
Dowling, Gladys, 
Guion, Josephine (capt.) 
MacCreadie, Florence, 
Merrill, Alice, 

The order of events follows : 

1. Introductory exerci- 

2. Span bend standing — heel raising. 

3. Rotary hand travelling. 

4. Balance exercises. 

5. One-half stretch fall out standing position. 

6. One-half stretch side fall standing position. 

7. Travelling between ropes. 

8. Overgrasp hanging flexion and extension of knees. 

9. Reach grasp standing — mount to balance hanging position. 

10. Balance hanging — somersault. 

11. Running swing jump over rope. 

12. Running face vault over box. 

13. Running oblique vault over box. 



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The first event, in which all four classes took part, showed, on 
the whole, good form and quick, intelligent obedience to orders. 
1910's showing was especially good. Events 5 and 6 were done re- 
markably well, requiring control of the body and good form, 
fault could be found with any one of the competitors in these two 
events. 

All of the events showed skill and practice, and mention should 
especially be made of the difficult exercises on the stall-bars, events 
2 and 8, which demanded remarkable endurance and poise on the 
part of the contestants. 

Perhaps the most interesting events to watch, as being less me- 
chanical than the others, were events 3. 7. 10 and n. Number 10 
particularly, the balance hanging-somersault, showed a great 
amount of practice and perfect control of the body. 

It is extremely hard, however, to speak of any one event with- 
out feeling that injustice has been done to the others, for every 
event was done on the whole in a praiseworthy manner, and was a 
credit to the teams, the instructors and the college. 

At the close of the • presented the Lincoln 

Challenge Cup to Sarah Baxter for the Class of 191 1, winner of first 
place in the meet. 

Ruth Elliott presented W's to Margery Hoyt, 1910, Ridie 
Guion. 191 1. and Bertha Schedlcr. 191 1. 

The judges were Kate B. Wallace. Radcliffe College, Edna L. 
Williams and Marion W. Hartwell, Wellesley College. 



COLLEGE NEWS 



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GEORGE BARKAS. 



JAMES KORINTVED 

Ladies' and Gents' 

Custom Tailor 

Shaw Block, Wellesley Sq. 

Special Attention Paid to 
Pressing and Cleaning 



ALICE Q. COOMBS, Wellesley '93 
Announces the Opening of a 

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in TAYLOR BLOCK 

Orders for Table Parties and Spreads 

Solicited 
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LECTURES BY DR. J. RENDEL HARRIS. 



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On Friday evening, April 15, in College Hall Chapel, Dr. J. 
Rendel Harris delivered the first of his lectures to the students of 
Biblical History. It was on "The Extra-Canonical Sayings of 
Jesus." The principal proof for the existence of such sayings lies in 
the discovery of some of these "logia" or "oracles" written on a 
single papyrus leaf, which was found during the excavation of an 
Egyptian city. The leaf is page eleven of a lost book and is covered 
by sayings, some homely and unknown, and others similar to those 
found in the gospels, and probably represents the earliest form of 
teaching. From this discovery has been evolved the theory of 
further lost sayings, which theory is substantiated by quotations 
which Paul makes of sayings of Jesus which are not found in the 
gospels; and further by the fact that phrases from the logia fit in so 
well with various phrases in the gospel to complete the two halves oi 
an antithetical sentence; while other sayings like that about the 
city on the hill quite overlap Biblical material. 

Dr. Harris then spoke of various legends existing in the apoch- 
ryphal gospel, especially those centering about the boyhood of 
[esus and showed how these, although often fantastic and quite 
crude, could be brought into connection with the gospel through 
Luke's story of Jesus and the doctors in the temple. He also called 
attention to one story probably overlooked by the early church 
which has survived through Mahomet in the Koran. 

In conclusion, Dr. Harris emphasized three points in regard to 
the welcoming of new additions to our knowledge of the gospels. 
We should preserve an attitude of criticism as to what Jesus said, 
an attitude of spiritual criticism as to what he meant, and finally 
we should consider what moral obligations these sayings entail. 

In his second lecture, on Saturday afternoon, April 16, Dr. 
Harris told the story of his discovery of the lost "Odes of Solomon," 
a discovery which is the first representative of a class of books 
which had entirely disappeared. 

For we have had no definite record left to us of the existence 
of songs in the early church. That hymns and chants were used, 
even in the time of Paul, we know from fragments found in the 
New Testament. Among these, we find, in Colossians 3: 10, the 
words "teaching and admonishing one another in psalms and 
hymns and spiritual songs;" and again in I Timothy 3: 16, what is 
evidently part of an old hymn— "God was manifest in the flesh, 
justified in the spirit, seen of angels, preached unto the Gentiles, 
believed on in the world, received up into glory." But there has 
been no collection of songs extant, such as the early Christians 
must have used. 

A book, the "Psalms of Solomon." has been known for several 
years; it consists of a collection of Psalms evidently written about 
50 B. C. But the fact that we should look for another book, the 
"Odes of Solomon," has been made evident from two sources. 
Lactantius, one of the early Christian fathers, quotes from the 
"Odes," which probably were translated into Latin by the fourth 
century. Again, in "Pistis Sophia," which, however, is a gnostic 
book, several "Odes" are quoted. This gives rise to the question 
as to whether the "Odes" were not themselves gnostic. 



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Manager, Miss Ruth Hodgklns 
Assistants, Miss Hilda Lundberg and 
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Open from 8.30, A.M. to 6, P.M. 
Monday until 8, P.M. 

TAILBY 

THE WELLESLEY FLORIST 

Office. 555 Washington St. Tel. 44-a 

Conservatories, 103 Linden St. 

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Orders by Mail or Otherwise are 

Given Prompt Attention. 

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COLLEGE NEWS 



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LECTURE BY DR. J. RENDEL HARRIS. 
— Continued. 



In January', 1909, as Dr. Harris was arranging the books in his 
library, he came across a pile of Syriac manuscript. Idly picking up 
one of these, he became interested by its strange resemblance to an 
old Psalter, and started to translate it. He found first a quotation 
from the "Psalms of Solomon," which arrested his attention; then 
as he went on, he discovered the originals of all the passages quoted 
by Lactantius and "Pistis Sophia." These identifications, as well 
as the general character of the songs have convinced Dr. Harris that 
he has at last discovered the missing "< ides." 

He read several of his translations of different Odes, explaining 
the characteristics which they display. They give no information 
with regard to the history of the church and use no canonical say- 
ings; yet, although Jesus is mentioned only indefinitely as the 
Messiah, or Christ, it is evident that He has come to earth. The 
whole tone of the "Odes," the spirituality and Christian truth 
which they show, seems to place their writing in the first century, 
perhaps about 75 A.D. That they are not gnostic Dr. Harris 
proved by a simple interpretation of those passages, whose meaning 
has been misinterpreted by the gnostic author of "Pistis Sophia." 
He declares that there is no doubt that there has been discovered an 
early Christian book of extraordinary beauty, which throws a new 
light on the struggles and conflicts of early Christianity. 



RADCLIFFE AND WELLESLEY DISCUSS EQUAL 
SUFFRAGE. 



It is much to be regretted that the Wellesley girls scarcely 
know their Radcliffe sisters. The Executive Committee of the 
Wellesley Equal Suffrage League realized how much we are missing 
when they spent Monday afternoon, April the tenth, with the Rad- 
cliffe Executive Committee and discussed questions of common in- 
terest over a cup of tea. 

Miss Gladys Holden presided over the little tea-table in a cozy 



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room. Our hostesses, with their soft English accents, would have 
bewildered any one whose idea of a suffragist is of a stalwart Amazon. 
They told us of their plans and their difficulties, and we felt ourselves 
very fortunate in the support of our Dean and the majority of the 
faculty. In comparing notes we found that the Radcliffe League has 
a greater number of members proportionately than ours, but we 
compare quite favorably considering our short life as an organization. 
We have already over a hundred members and the whole college 
has not as yet been canvassed. We find, much to our encouragement, 
that most of the girls plead ignorance, while comparatively few, 
indifference, which promises well for the futun : lor as soon as it is 
realized that the League is formed to consist of girls who do not 
know definitely enough to be able to judge, but who want to know, 
the membership will be increased. The League is going to give the 
girls a chance to know so that at lei - students cannot be 

accused of ignorance in regard to a question which so vitally concerns 
many women in more unfavorable circumstances. 

The Radcliffe League endeavors, as we do, to get speakers both 
for and against equal suffrage: for they feel that college is the place 
for intelligent investigation rather than propaganda. Mrs. George 
who is to lecture on May 5 at S o'clock in the Agora House before 
the members of our club, also presented the anti-suffrage movement 
to the members of the Radcliffe League. Perhaps we might explain 
here that the Wellesley League is to have one open meeting this year, 
to which all the members of the college are invited, and which we 
hope to be addressed by Mr. Max Eastman, who is reported to have 
swept Cornell by storm. In addition there are to be at least two 
informal meetings to which only the members are invited— hence. 
the advantage of being a member. At one of these Mrs. George is 
10 speak; and at the other, perhaps, Mr. Nash. 

We came away from the tea feeling indebted to the Radcliffe 
girls for many new ideas and fresh inspiration. 



COLLEGE NEWS 



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ALUMN/E NOTES. 

In addition to notes concerning graduates, the Alumnae 
column will contain items of interest about members of the 
Faculty, past and present, and former students. 

Miss Margaret Hull. 1909, is teaching Latin in Silver Creek, 
New York. 

The management of the private school conducted for twenty- 
two years by Miss Caroline Pierce has been transferred by her to 
Miss Mary Ware and Miss Julia B. Park, 1901, who have been 
teaching in the school for some time. 

Miss Ruth E. Whiting, 1906, is teaching English and Latin in 
the Chester (Conn.) High School. 

Miss Nellie Taylor Cope, 1888-89, is teaching in the Shaw 
School, Wellesley Hills, Massachusetts. 

Miss Helen M. Farrell, 1908, is teaching in Walnut Hill School, 
Natick, Massachusetts. 

The Ohio Valley Wellesley Club has kindly extended an invita- 
tion for luncheon on May 14, to all the former Wellesley students 
who visited Cincinnati at the time when the Federation of Women's 
Clubs met in May. All those desiring to attend arc asked to write 
as soon as possible to Mrs. A. I. Cobb, 1559 Garrard Avenue, Cov- 
ington, Ky. 



ENGAGEMENT. 

Miss Winifred Vandervoort, of the class of 1907. 1(l ^ Ir - Stanley 
Rand, of Tonawanda, New York. 



BIRTHS. 

March 7, 1910, at Berry School, Rome, Georgia, a son, Alexan- 
der Purkis, to Emily Freeland MeClain, 1906. 

March 20, 1910, in Maiden, Massachusetts, a daughter, Mar- 
joric, to Mrs. Clifford E. Paige (Alice Cutler Perry, 1907), and grand- 
daughter to Mrs. Joseph M. Perry (('.race L. Cutler, 1876-78). 

DEATH. 

April 8, 1910, in Wellesley, suddenly, Lydia A. Beebe, widow 
of the late Captain John A. Beebe, and mother of Alice G. Beebe, 
1896. 

CHANGE OF ADDRESS. 

Mrs. William S. Gaylord (Mary Comley, 1899), 15 Waldron 
Avenue, Summit, New Jersey. 

Mrs. Charles E. Keeler (Marie Biddle, 1907), Fountain Springs, 
Pennsylvania, care of Dr. J. C. Biddle. 



OBSERVATORY NOTES. 



will have upon it cannot yet be predicted, whether it will display 
a marvelous tail as in 1456 A. I)., or an insignificant one as in 1607, 
or a medium one as in 1835. 

It may be of interest to know the predictions in reference to the 
best times for observation of Halley's comet the next months. 

April 1(1 the sun rises at 5.18 o'clock and Halley's comet one 
hour and thirty minutes before the sun, that is, at 3.48 A.M. It will 
be due almost east in the sky near the horizon. 

May 10, the sun rises 4.44 o'clock, the comet two hours, forty 
minutes before the sun, or at about 2 A.M. The comet will lie near 
Algenib, the star in the Square of Pegasus nearest the vernal equinox. 

May 18, at 10.36 P.M. the comet begins its transit across the 
sun's disk, visible on the other side of the earth, where the sun is 
up. The comet is then exactly between us and the sun and the tail 
directed towards the earth. If the tail is fourteen million miles 
it will envelope the earth as comets' tails did twice in the last century. 
Possibly we may see a phosphorescence in the sky, possibly nothing. 

May 20 the sun sets at 7.19 P.M. and the comet, which will be 
near Aldcbcran, one hour after the sun, a little north of the west point. 

May 27 the sun sets at 7.26 o'clock and the comet, which will be 
near the Head of Hydra, will set four hours after the sun or not until 
near midnight. ^ 

June 15 the sun sets at 7. 38 P.M. and the comet three hours and 
twenty minutes after the sun, or about 11 P.M. Soon'aftcr this the 
comet will probably disappear from distance not to be seen by most 
of us again from this planet. 



ART EXHIBITIONS. 



Vose's GALLERY: Mr. Williams' Paintings. 

Twentieth Century Club: Mr. Cascr's Paintings. 
COPLEY GALLERY: Pictures by Miss Patterson. 
Kimball's Gallery: Mr. White's Paintings. 
Boston Art Cub: Exhibition of Members' Work. 
Akt>, and Crafts: Exhibition of Basketry. 



THEATER NOTES. 



Halley's comet is moving in its orbit in obedience to the laws 
of gravitation with absolute precision, but what effect the sun's heat 



Majestic: Viola Allen in "The White Sister." 

Hollis-stkkict: Fritzi Scheff in "The Prima Donna." 

Grand Opera House: "Monte Cristo." 

Tkemoni: Raymond Hitchcock in "The Man Who Owns Broad- 
way." 

Park: William Hodge in "The Man From Home." 

Colonial: "The Third Degree." 

Boston: Eva Tanguay in "Follies of 1909." 

Boston Opera House: "II Trovatore." 

Sin BERT: The New Theater Company, presenting its repertoire of 
classic and modern plays.